Multi Decoder

This tool is designed to solve a wide variety of codes and ciphers (currently supported variations). To use this tool, enter the encrypted text in the box below along with any other relevant data (keywords, alphabets, numbers, etc) and it will attempt to solve it for you. See the FAQ below for more details.

Please enter text to decrypt in the box above.

Replace Text:
Group Characters:

 #1
 #2
 #3
Optional:

Result: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ


This multi decoder is designed to support a large number of codes and ciphers. Not all codes and ciphers have keywords, alphabets, numbers, letter translation, etc so if the code or cipher doesn't require it, those fields will be ignored. If one does require something, the text of that box will be updated to tell you what it is missing in order to decode.

Typically you would put any keywords in the first Key/Alphabet box and any custom alphabets in the next one. If all you have are keywords or alphabets, try rotating the order just in case the cipher was coded with them switched.


Caesar Cipher - Automatic Solver
Caesar: This attempts to solve the caesar cipher by trying all 26 possible shift values and calculating the cross-entropy with English letter frequencies (unigram model). Use the up/down arrows to rotate through the results to see all 26 combinations.
Caesar Cipher - Rot 5
Caesar Rot 5: Just numbers are rotated (ie: 5 => 0, 3 => 8).
Caesar Cipher - Rot 18
Caesar Rot 18: Both numbers and letters are rotated by 5 and 13 respectively.
Caesar Cipher - Rot 47
Caesar Rot 47: All ASCII characters are rotated.
Caesar Cipher - Rot 123 (Forward)
Caesar Rot 123 (Forward): This special version of the Rot Cipher takes a set of characters and rotates them each forward in incremental order.
Caesar Cipher - Rot 123 (Reverse)
Caesar Rot 123 (Forward): This special version of the Rot Cipher takes a set of characters and rotates them each in decremental order.
Vigenère Automatic Solver
Vigenère Automatic Solver: This attempts to break the codeword automatically. It searches for codewords up to 11 letters in length in 6 languages. Longer texts have a better chance of being deciphered due to this using letter frequencies to solve. If you suspect your text is a Vigenère and the text is not clear after automatic decryption, try changing the codeword length above or language and it will attempt decrypting again.
Vigenère
Vigenère: This is a method of encrypting alphabetic text by using a series of interwoven Caesar ciphers based on the letters of a keyword.
Autokey
Autokey: This version starts with a relatively-short keyword and appends the message to it. For example if the keyword is "QUEEN" and the message is "ATTACK AT DAWN", the key would be "QUEENATTACKATDAWN".
The standard Bacon code typically uses A's and B's or 0's and 1's (both are supported by default). However if your code only consists of 2 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the two characters for Standard Bacon, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1 and second one in Key/Alphabet #2 positions.
Standard A/B (Distinct)
Standard A/B (Distinct - Inverted)
Standard A/B (I = J and U = V)
Standard A/B (I = J and U = V - Inverted)
Case Sensitive (Distinct)
Case Sensitive (I = J and U = V)
Alphabet Halves A-M & N-Z (Distinct)
Alphabet Halves A-M & N-Z (I = J and U = V)
Morse code typically uses dots (.) and dashes (-). However if your code only consists of 2 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the two characters, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1 and second one in Key/Alphabet #2 positions. If you have a custom separator between words (besides a space, /, \, or |), enter this in the Key/Alphabet #3 position.
Morse - Normal
Morse - Reverse
Morse - Swapped
Morse - Swapped Reverse
The Abaddon code consists of three characters ¥, µ, and þ. However if your code only consists of 3 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the three characters, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1, second one in Key/Alphabet #2 position, and third one in the Key/Alphabet #3 position. You might also try rearranging the order of your custom letters just in case.
Additive: Each character of the alphabet is assigned a value and a key number within the alphabet is chosen. Each character is added with this key number and the corresponding letter is substituted (mod 26). The values of the alphabet characters start at 0 so A = 0, B = 1, etc. Example the letter M (12th letter) and key 16 would be 12 + 16 = 28. 28 modulo 26 = 2 so the letter C would be chosen. Enter the number in the Num 1 position. If you have a custom alphabet or keyword, put this in the Key/Alphabet #1 position.
ADFGX
ADFGX: Enter the keyword under Key/Alphabet #1. The default 25-character alphabet has J swapped for I. If you have a custom alphabet, enter this under Key/Alphabet #2. To customize this alphabet, see the full ADFGX tool.
ADFGVX
ADFGVX: Enter the keyword under Key/Alphabet #1. The default 36-character alphabet consists of A-Z and 0-9. If you have a custom alphabet, enter this under Key/Alphabet #2. To customize this alphabet, see the full ADFGVX tool.
Affine: Enter an odd number under Num 1 from 1 to 25. Enter any number from 0 to 25 in Num 2. If you have a custom alphabet, enter this in Key/Alphabet #1 (Default is A-Z).
ASCII-85: ASCII-85 (or Base85) is a coding system created by Paul E. Rutter of Adobe Systems that uses 5 ASCII characters to code 4 bytes (similar to base64 encoding). ASCII 85 is used in PDF file format for example.
Atbash: This cipher arranges the standard alphabet backwards from Z to A.
The Backslash Code in text form is represented by a forward slash (/), a pipe (|) and a backward slash (\). However if your code only consists of 3 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the three characters for the Backslash, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1, second one in Key/Alphabet #2 position, and third one in Key/ Alphabet #3 position.
Barcode Numbers: Barcodes are composed of both black and white lines and are typically found on product packaging. The 12-digit UPC (Universal Product Code) is used in the US and Canada and consists of 10 middle numbers and two numbers at both ends of the code (with the last one being a check digit). See more details here.
Base Conversion: This attempts to convert the text from different bases (2 to 62) into decimal (Base 10). Sometimes different converters have their letter case swapped so this will give the output showing lower case (a - z) then upper case (A - Z) first and then swap the case and try it again.
Base64: This is an encoding scheme commonly used when there is a need to encode binary data to be stored and transferred over media that are designed to deal with textual data.
The standard Baudot/Murray code uses 0's and 1's. If your code has just two single characters that aren't 0 or 1, it could still be this code if it was obfuscated. To customize the two characters, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1 and second one in Key/Alphabet #2 positions.
Baudot - ITA1
Baudot - ITA1: The original Baudot code was a 5-bit code that became known as the International Telegraph Alphabet No 1 (ITA1).
Baudot - ITA1 (Inverted)
Baudot Murray - ITA2
Baudot Murray - ITA2: In 1901, the Baudot code was improved by Donald Murray to minimize the wear on the machinery. He assigned the most frequently used symbols and letters to the codes with fewest punched holes. This led to the International Telegraph Alphabet No 2 (ITA2) standard.
Baudot Murray - ITA2 (Inverted)
Beaufort - Standard
Beaufort: This is a polyalphabetic substitution cipher that is similar to the Vigenère cipher, only that instead of adding letter values, it calculates the cipher letter by taking the key letter minus the plaintext letter.
Beaufort - Autokey
Beaufort Autokey: Similar to above but this version starts with a relatively-short keyword and appends the message to it.
Beaufort Variant - Standard
Beaufort Variant: Similar to above but the key difference is the encryption is performed like decryption in the Vigenère and decryption is performed like the encryption in the Vigenère.
Beaufort Variant - Autokey
Beaufort Variant Autokey: Similar to the variant above but this version starts with a relatively-short keyword and appends the message to it.
Bifid: The cipher uses a 25-character alphabet that typically has J swapped for I. To customize these swap letters, please set your own at the top under "translate this letter". Also you can choose a period grouping by entering this in the Num 1 position. The default period grouping is the message length.
This section shows each of these number formats converted back into ASCII.
Binary
Decimal
Hexadecimal
Octal
Brainf*ck
Brainf*ck: Brainf*ck is an (unfortunately named) esoteric programming language created in 1993 by Urban Müller. The language consists of eight commands: > < + - . , [ and ].
Ook Ook
Ook Ook: Ook! is a joke programming language created by David Morgan-Mar. It is identical to brainf*ck, except that the instructions are changed into Orangutan words. The Ook! commands are: Ook. Ook?, Ook? Ook., Ook. Ook., Ook! Ook!, Ook! Ook., Ook. Ook!, Ook! Ook? and Ook? Ook!.
Short Ook
Short Ook: A variant of Ook! is called Short Ook! where the Ook are stripped out, leaving the following commands: .?, ?., .., !!, !., .!, !? and ?!.
Burrows Wheeler: This compression algorithm rearranges a character string into runs of similar characters. This process can take a long time depending on the length of the text to decrypt. If the message length is greater than 1,000 characters, you will need to click the Decode button above to run this independent of the other decodes.

The End of File (EOF) character must be unique to the message. The default is "$" but you may enter a custom one in the Pad position.
Caesar Box: The default pad character is "|". If you have a different one, enter that under the Pad box.
Chaocipher: This encryption uses two rotating disks on which is written a custom alphabet. The two disks are identical and linked with a kind of gearing (ratio 1:1) that if a disk is turned clockwise, the other turns counter-clockwise.
The Chinese Code in text form is represented by a dash (-) and a pipe (|). However if your code only consists of 2 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the two characters for the Chinese Code, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1 and second one in Key/Alphabet #2 positions.
Clock Code: This encrypts plaintext using numbers on a 12/24-hour clock as in the image below. A colon (:) separates each letter and two zeros separates each word (00).
Columnar Transposition: This involves writing the plaintext out in rows and then reading the ciphertext off in columns. The row length that is used is the same as the length of the keyword with the plaintext being padded to make it fit into the rectangle under the keyword. The columns are now reordered alphabetically and then the ciphertext is read off along the columns.

The default pad character is "X". If you have a custom pad character, enter this in the Pad box above.
Cow: This programming language is an esoteric programming language created by Sean Heber in 2003. It is a Brainf*ck variant designed humorously with Bovinae in mind. Cow has twelve instructions (four more than Brainfuck) and is Turing-complete. Most instructions are moos, only the capitalization varies: mOo, moO, mOO, Moo, and so on. MMM, OOO, oom and OOM are the exceptions. All other character combinations are ignored and treated as comments.
The standard decabit code typically uses "+" and "-". However if your code only consists of 2 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the two characters for decabit, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1 and second one in Key/Alphabet #2 positions.
Decabit
Decabit: This code consists of 10 characters of "+" and "-" that directly translate to numbers from 0 to 126. These values are then mapped to the corresponding ASCII characters/numbers.
Decabit - Inverted
Digital Root - A1 Z26
Digital Root A1 Z26: This tool works by converting text to its alphanumeric value and uses a recursive function to find the digital root value. Letters arranged with A = 1 and Z = 26.
Digital Root - A0 Z25
Digital Root A0 Z25: Letters arranged with A = 0 and Z = 25.
Digital Root - A26 Z1
Digital Root A26 Z1: Letters arranged with A = 26 and Z = 1.
Digital Root - A25 Z0
Digital Root A25 Z0: Letters arranged with A = 25 and Z = 0.
Digital Root - Vanity
Digital Root Vanity: Letters arranged by the numbers on a phone's keypad. A = 2 and Z = 9.
Digital Root - Scrabble
Digital Root Scrabble: Letters are arranged by the numbers on Scrabble tiles.
Double Transposition: This is basically a columnar transposition followed by another columnar transposition.
Dvorak: This converts from Dvorak Simplified keyboard layout into the Qwerty keyboard layout.
Enclosed Loops: This tool is designed to count the enclosed areas in uppercase, lowercase, and numbers. Use a space to separate the groupings. This will count a four (4) to be open and closed separately. Also, beware that some script letters have extra loops such as a cursive "" that may not be accounted for with this tool. If your data has these extra enclosed areas, modify the output for that section to include the extra count.
The Five Needle Telegraph Code in text form is represented by a forward slash (/), a pipe (|) and a backward slash (\). However if your code only consists of 3 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the three characters for this code, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1, second one in Key/Alphabet #2 position, and third one in Key/ Alphabet #3 position.
Five Needle Telegraph: Also known as the Cooke and Wheatstone telegraph, this code is represented by three characters \ | / in a set of 5. To save space, uncommon letters were omitted in the code so the letters C, J, Q, V, X and Z are not included here. Be sure to place a space between each set of characters to decrypt properly.
This cipher uses two 25 letter alphabets where typically J is swapped for I. To customize these swap letters, please set your own at the top under "translate this letter". The default alphabets for both are A-Z without the letter J.
Fractionated Morse: This first converts the plaintext to morse code, then enciphers fixed size blocks of morse code back to letters. This procedure means plaintext letters are mixed into the ciphertext letters i.e. one plaintext letter does not map to one ciphertext letter.

If you have a custom alphabet, enter this in the Key/Alphabet #1 position.
Geocache Number to ID
GC Number to ID: This uses a custom Base-31 conversion to convert the GC Number to or from the GC-ID. The characters used for the Base-31 conversion are 0123456789ABCDEFGHJKMNPQRTVWXYZ (the letters ILOSU are omitted). Example: GCK25B = 156997
Geocache ID to Number
GC ID to Number: This converts the ID number back to the GC format. Example 156997 = GCK25B
Goldbug: From the Edgar Allen Poe book The Gold-Bug, this is a simple substitution cipher using the following letters in the place of A - Z: 52-†81346,709*‡.$();?¶]¢:[
Gronsfeld Standard
Gronsfeld: This cipher is a polyalphabetic cipher (a series of Caesar ciphers) where the shift is determined by numbers (between 0 and 9). It is similar to the Vigenère cipher, but the key uses digits instead of letters.
Gronsfeld Autokey
Gronsfeld Autokey: This version starts with a relatively-short keyword and appends the message to it. For example if the keyword is "QUEEN" and the message is "ATTACK AT DAWN", the key would be "QUEENATTACKATDAWN".
Hodor: Although this is drawn from an esoteric language created as an homage to Hodor from Game of Thrones, this tool incorporates the upper and lower case letters (minus the letters in his name) using the translation tables from that language. It's basically a simple substitution cipher.
Kamasutra: This is a simple substitution cipher where the 26 letters of the alphabet are organized into 13 pairs of characters which are then used to encrypt the text by direct substitution of the letters in the pairs.
The Kenny code consists of a group of 3 letters in a combination of M, F & P. However if your code only consists of 3 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the three characters, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1, second one in Key/Alphabet #2 position, and third one in the Key/Alphabet #3 position. You might also try rearranging the order of your custom letters just in case.
QWERTY
QWERTY: This simple substitution cipher maps the keys of a keyboard layout to letters like this: QWERTY = ABCDEF. The keyboard layout is QWERTYUIOPASDFGHJKLZXCVBNM.
QWERTZ
QWERTZ: This simple substitution cipher maps the keys of a keyboard layout to letters like this: QWERTZ = ABCDEF. The keyboard layout is QWERTZUIOPASDFGHJKLYXCVBNM.
AZERTY
AZERTY: This simple substitution cipher maps the keys of a keyboard layout to letters like this: AZERTY = ABCDEF. The keyboard layout is AZERTYUIOPQSDFGHJKLWXCVBNM.
Function Row Start (A = 42)
This allows you to convert QWERTY letters from their coordinate location on the keyboard by rows and columns. It will first look for which row from the top of the keyboard and then which column from the left that the character appears.
Number Row Start (A = 32)
Letter Row Start (A = 22)
Keyboard Neighbors
Shift Right with A-Z, 0-9, Special Chars
Keyboard Neighbors: This tool allows you to shift letters on a qwerty keyboard right or left.
Keyboard Neighbors
Shift Left with A-Z, 0-9, Special Chars
Keyboard Neighbors
Shift Right with A-Z, 0-9
Keyboard Neighbors
Shift Left with A-Z, 0-9
Keyed Caesar: This is a variation to the standard Caesar cipher but the alphabet is "keyed" by using a word and those letters are moved to the front of the alphabet before the rotation is performed.
Letters Numbers
Letters Numbers: This converts from letters to numbers. If converting from numbers, you will need to put a space between each number for the tool to work correctly.
Numbers Letters
Numbers Letters: This converts from numbers to letters. Be sure to put a space between each number for the tool to work correctly.
Multiplicative: Each character of the alphabet is assigned a value and a coprime key to the length of the alphabet is chosen. Each character is multiplied with this key and the corresponding letter is substituted. Example the letter M (12th letter) and key 3 would be 12 * 3 = 36. 36 modulo 26 = 10 so the letter K would be chosen. To use this, please enter an odd number in the Num 1 position.
Nak Nak: Language translator from duckspeak to human.
Number Pad Lines: This tool lets you convert numbers drawn on a keypad which spells out letters and numbers by the shape. Ex: "T" would be 1328, where you start at the "1" and draw a line through all the numbers in order until you get to the "8", which the final shape would look like a "T".
Numerology - Pathagorean
Numerology - Pathagorean: This cipher uses values for letters and adds them together based on a specific number set. This version splits the standard alphabet every 9th character and numbers them like this: 12345678912345678912345678. (Ex. A = 1, J = 1, S = 1, Z = 8, SUM = 11)
Numerology - Pathagorean (With 0)
Numerology - Pathagorean (With 0): This version is exactly the same as above except it splits the alphabet at every 10th character and numbers them like this: 12345678901234567890123456. (Ex. A = 1, J = 0, S = 9, Z = 6, SUM = 16)
Numerology - Chaldean
Numerology - Chaldean: This version is the same as above except it arranges the alphabet like ABCDEUOFIKGMHVZPJRLTNWQSXY and numbers them like 12345678123456781234561351. (Ex. A = 1, J = 1, S = 3, Z = 7, SUM = 12)
One Time Pad / Vernam: This is an encryption technique that cannot be cracked, but requires the use of a single-use pre-shared key that is no smaller than the message being sent.
Pizzini: This cipher is very similar to the classic Caesar cipher where the alphabet is shifted three letters (A => D, B => E, etc). The difference is the Pizzini cipher assigns those letters to numbers so A = 4, etc. Note: This cipher uses the Latin alphabet of 26 characters. The original version used the Italian alphabet, which only has 21 characters.
The standard Planet barcode typically uses "╻" and "┃" or i's and I's (both are supported by default). However if your code only consists of 2 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the two characters, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1 and second one in Key/Alphabet #2 positions.
Planet Barcode
Planet Barcode: The Postal Alpha Numeric Encoding Technique (PLANET) barcode was used by the United States Postal Service to identify and track pieces of mail during delivery.
Playfair: This was the first practical digraph substitution cipher. The technique encrypts pairs of letters (digraphs) instead of single letters as in the simple substitution cipher. It uses a pad character (default is "X") but if you have a custom one, enter this in the Pad position. If you have a custom alphabet or keyword, enter this in the Key/Alphabet #1 position. Typically in this cipher, the letter J is merged with the letter I but you can customize this above in the "Translate this letter" section.
Polybius Square: This is essentially identical to the simple substitution cipher except that each plaintext character is enciphered as 2 ciphertext characters. Since it is based on a 5 x 5 grid, the key must be 5 unique characters long (enter this in the Key/Alphabet #1 position.) If you have a custom alphabet or keyword, enter this in the Key/Alphabet #2 position. Typically in this cipher, the letter J is merged with the letter I but you can customize this above in the "Translate this letter" section.
Porta Key: This a polyalphabetic substitution cipher. Where the Vigenère cipher is a polyalphabetic cipher with 26 alphabets, the Porta Key is basically the same except it only uses 13 alphabets.
The standard postnet barcode typically uses "╻" and "┃" or i's and I's (both are supported by default). However if your code only consists of 2 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the two characters, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1 and second one in Key/Alphabet #2 positions.
Postnet Barcode
Postnet Barcode: Postal Numeric Encoding Technique (POSTNET) is a barcode symbology used by the United States Postal Service to assist in directing mail. The ZIP Code or ZIP+4 code is encoded in half- and full-height bars.
Quadoo: This is a font that consists of 6 lines intended for the visually impaired. This converts the numbers back into letters.
Railfence: This is a transposition cipher that follows a simple rule for mixing up the characters in the plaintext to form the ciphertext. Enter the number of rows in the Num 1 position (default is 3 rows). If you also have an offset number, enter this in the Num 2 position.
Roman Numerals
Roman Numerals: This is a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. "I": 1, "V": 5, "X": 10, "L": 50, "C": 100, "D": 500 and "M": 1000
Roman Numerals - Chronogram
Chronogram: This is a sentence or inscription in which specific letters (interpreted as numerals) stand for a particular date when rearranged. Example: AMORE MATVRITAS = MMVI = 2006
Route Transposition - Left to Right (With Spaces)
Route Transposition: This cipher rearranges the plaintext letters into columns and rows based on a shape of an imaginary path drawn on a grid, which contains all the message letters.
Route Transposition - Left to Right (No Spaces)
Route Transposition - Right to Left (With Spaces)
Route Transposition - Right to Left (No Spaces)
Route Transposition - Alternating Left to Right (With Spaces)
Route Transposition - Alternating Left to Right (No Spaces)
Running Key: The Running Key cipher has the same internal workings as the Vigenère cipher. The difference lies in how the key is chosen; the Vigenère cipher uses a short key that repeats, whereas the running key cipher uses a long key such as an excerpt from a book.
Scytale: This is based on a transposition method. The diameter of the Scytale can be regarded as the key of the cipher. In Ancient Greece, the belt of the messenger was composed of a stretch of leather which had characters written on the backside. It seemed like a meaningless sequence of characters but when the stretch of leather is winded around a piece of wood with the correct diameter, an encoded message can be read. Enter your columns in the Num 1 position and any custom pad character in the Pad position.
Segment Display - 7
Segment Display: The segment display is not universal and can be assigned different values than what is translated here be default. If your code has different values than what is listed below, you may need to modify your text to fit the default values.

Default 7 Values: A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.
Segment Display - 9
Segment Display 9: Default Values: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, and I.
Segment Display - 14
Segment Display 14: Default Values: A, B, C, D, E, F, G1, G2, H, I, J, K, L and M.
Segment Display - 16
Segment Display 16: Default Values: A1, A2, B, C, D2, D1, E, F, G1, G2, H, I, J, K, L and M.
Shadoks Numerals: This uses Base 4 (quaternary) with these 4 words: GA, BU, ZO and MEU, respectively for 0, 1, 2, and 3.
The Slash and Pipe Code in text form is represented by a forward slash (/), a pipe (|) and a backward slash (\). However if your code only consists of 3 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the three characters for this code, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1, second one in Key/Alphabet #2 position, and third one in Key/ Alphabet #3 position.
Straddling Checkerboard: The straddling checkerboard is a substitution cipher, except that the substitutions are of variable length. The key for a straddling checkerboard is a permutation of the alphabet along with 2 numbers between 0 and 9. Enter the two numbers respectively in Num 1 and Num 2 positions. If you have a custom alphabet or keyword, enter this in Key/Alphabet #1 position (default alphabet is A - Z).
Substitution
Substitution: This is a cipher that consists of substituting every plaintext character for a different ciphertext character. It differs from the Caesar cipher in that the cipher alphabet is not simply the alphabet shifted, it is completely jumbled. Enter the keyword or custom alphabet into Key/Alphabet #1 position.
Albam
Albam: The alphabet used is LMNOPQRSTUVWXYZABCDEFGHIJK.
Carbonaro
Carbonaro: The alphabet used is OPGTIVCHEJKRNMABQLZDUFWXYS.
Tap Code Numbers 5 x 5
Tap Code Numbers 5 x 5: Based on a 5 x 5 grid of letters with K being replaced by C. Each letter is communicated by tapping two numbers: the first designated the row (horizontal) and the second designated the column (vertical).
Tap Code Pattern 5 x 5
Tap Code Pattern 5 x 5: This section chops up the text by spaces and counts the sections to translate into Tap Code. It works for any character just in case the code has been obfuscated but the pattern still exists.
Tap Code Numbers 6 x 6
Tap Code Numbers 6 x 6: Based on a 6 x 6 grid of all letters and numbers. Each character is communicated by tapping two numbers: the first designated the row (horizontal) and the second designated the column (vertical).
Tap Code Pattern 6 x 6
Tap Code Pattern 6 x 6: This section chops up the text by spaces and counts the sections to translate into Tap Code. It works for any character just in case the code has been obfuscated but the pattern still exists.
The Tomtom Code in text form is represented by a forward slash (/) and a backward slash (\). However if your code only consists of 2 characters, it could still be this code if it is obfuscated. To customize the two characters, enter the first one in Key/Alphabet #1 and second one in Key/Alphabet #2 positions.
Trifid: This cipher uses three tables to fractionate letters into trigrams, mixes the parts of the trigrams and then uses the table to convert the trigrams back to letters again. This cipher uses 27 characters (26 letters plus one pad character). Enter your pad character in the Pad spot above (default is a + sign).
Trithemius: This cipher uses a tabula recta which contains the 26 letters of the from A to Z along the top of each column and repeated along the left side at the beginning of each row. Each row of the square has the 26 letters, shifted one position to the right in a cyclic way as the rows progress downwards. Once B moves to the front, A moves down to the end. This continues for the entire square.
Übchi Transposition - Duplicates Forward
Übchi: This was used by the Germans during World War 1 and is a double columnar transposition cipher. This takes the column order and if there are any duplicates, it arranges them in forward or backward order. This cipher was originally found on Rumkin.com and was created by Tyler Akins.

Enter a column order (or keyword) in the Key/Alphabet #1 position. If you have a custom pad character (default is "X"), put this in the Pad position.
Übchi Transposition - Duplicates Backwards
Vanity: This code corresponds to the letters used on the telephone number pad. The number 0 does not correspond to letters and is used as a space in the output. If you have a custom separator, put this in the Num 1 position.

Three methods are supported with this tool. Example "CACHE" in each method would be as follows: Method 1: 222 2 222 44 33, Method 2: 23 21 23 42 32, Method 3: 2/ 2\ 2/ 4| 3|. Make sure to put a space between each set of characters.

Note: T9 is not supported here. See the T9 Decoder if you think your text might be this code.